Angry Response to Betsy DeVos Political Cartoon Proves Its Point

BY TYLER O'NEIL FEBRUARY 15, 2017

On Tuesday, the Belleville News-Democrat published a political cartoon depicting Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in the same situation as a poor black girl in Norman Rockwell's 1960s painting "The Problem We All Live With." The cartoon's use of overstatement had its intended effect — causing a storm of controversy which illustrated the anger many still have at DeVos, despite the altercation with protesters who physically blocked her entrance into a school and which resulted in assault charges.

Ironically, while the cartoon arguably deserved ridicule on its merits, the angry overreaction from liberals helped to illustrate the point — that the Left irrationally demonizes and protests against DeVos in the same kind of heartless way southerners protested against a little black girl who represented the end of segregation.

Slate's chief political correspondent, Jamelle Bouie, posted the cartoon with a two-word commentary, "my god [sic]."

Kevin M. Kruse, a historian and author of One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Created Christian America, explained why the cartoon could quite reasonably be considered offensive. He recalled the name of the black girl in the Norman Rockwell painting — Ruby Bridges. She remains an activist today.

READ THE FULL STORY AT PJMEDIA.COM.